A Brutally Intelligent Exhibition: War-Damaged Works at the Bode Museum Drive a Discussion about Conservation

Originally published at www.rebeccafifieldpreservation.com. When preservation fails, do we have the courage to discuss where to go next? Opening today, 19 March 2015 at the Bode Museum is The Lost Museum, an exhibition of 70 works damaged in World War II. Bullet … Continue reading

Book: The Public Library by Robert Dawson

Last night I read The Public Library, A Photographic Essay by Robert Dawson. I didn’t borrow it from my public library, which is the Carnegie-built Webster branch of the New York Public Library. It’s at the end of my street … Continue reading

Doors Open Baltimore – This Saturday, October 25

After my last post about the decay of Baltimore progressive civic icons from the 19th century, Doors Open Baltimore celebrates the industrial past that made it possible this Saturday, October 25, 2014 from 10am-4pm. Fascinating physical industrial heritage spanning from … Continue reading

The Zoo, the Park, and a Baltimore Befuddlement

I’m not an expert on Baltimore, by any means. I’ve never lived there. I was born in Towson and grew up in Carroll County. But Baltimore was my first exposure to City and all that big “C” entails. The redeveloped … Continue reading

Racer Dips

That’s 1930s speak for “roller coaster.” At least it was to my grandmother, Gurnice Stephens. She grew up on Mt. Pleasant Orchard in Harford County, but worked as a nanny and a nightclub violinist in Baltimore during the 1930s and … Continue reading

Transportation Tuesday: Old Railway Storefront Design

During my maternity leave, I joined Abandoned Rails on Facebook. During those 1am and 3am feeds (lucky me) the almost 7,000 members on Abandoned Rails posted fascinating photos of endeavors past rusting into the dirt. They are stories of industry … Continue reading

Wanderlust Wednesday: Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Redux

Better known as the PATH, the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad began shuttling passengers through its cast iron tunnels between Manhattan and points in New Jersey in 1908. My travels have been constrained in the last couple of months due to … Continue reading

Transit Tuesday: NYC Department of Records Photo Archive and the Williamsburg Bridge Streetcar

The incredible site that is the NYC Department of Records Photo Archive showcases the grit and mechanics of the 20th century city. Some of the photographs are iconic, such as If you go, use the classification tree on the left. … Continue reading

Museum Monday: Skansen Poster

A great poster advertising the first living history museum: Skansen in Stockholm Sweden, founded 1891. Skansen is part Swedish heritage museum, part regional zoo. It sits on a steeply pitched hill at the center of one of the fourteen islands … Continue reading

Bye Bye Schrafft’s: Losing More Unique Buildings on the UES

A “Rat Poison” sign appeared on the front door of 155 East 79th street. Generally, that’s the sign that indicates death is close at hand. Obviously the rats are going to kick it. But it’s the building that is coming … Continue reading