Small Living Isn’t Morally Inferior

What happened to “less is more”? Dr. V and I are preparing for the arrival of our little guy Spud sometime in February (yes,  you can expect a good deal of silence from me about that time). As I’ve described … Continue reading

Transportation Tuesday: Jim Crow Era Rail Car at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Recently, the National Museum of African American History installed two of its first objects, though walls are scant and the roof does not yet exist. A 77-ton rail car built in 1918 and used by the Southern Railway was installed … Continue reading

18th Century Convicts Marched from Newgate to the Port

Convicts made up one of the significant immigrant populations to the American colonies in the eighteenth century. But try locating an image that says “convict” if you are preparing a presentation. This image from The Newgate Calendar, a tabloid-like publication … Continue reading

Photo: Hunting Dog Redux, c. 1923.

My Harford County, Maryland family could never be described as prominent. They are not historical figures. Certainly, the family names are ones the people know, interwoven through local people’s memories (read about how interwoven my family is here). They, like so … Continue reading

A Philadelphia Servant, 1787

  A pie lays broken in the street, a distraught servant teased by the chimney sweeps who caused her to drop it. She’s likely on her way back from the bakery to which her mistress sent the pie to be … Continue reading

Museum Monday: Skansen Poster

A great poster advertising the first living history museum: Skansen in Stockholm Sweden, founded 1891. Skansen is part Swedish heritage museum, part regional zoo. It sits on a steeply pitched hill at the center of one of the fourteen islands … Continue reading

Photo: Huntin’ Dog, c. 1920

I don’t hunt, and what little I do know of hunting is bound into my Susquehanna River DNA. I figure the man reposing by the tree with his trusty companion has been hunting ducks or geese or other small game, like … Continue reading

Transit Tuesday: San Francisco’s Market Street Railway New Owner of Weirdest Streetcar

I love San Francisco: especially their historic Market Street Railway which runs historic cars from all the cities that have trashed their streetcar lines. You see PCCs from Boston and Peter Witts from Milan. It’s lots of fun. And they … Continue reading

Wanderlust Wednesday: Taking The Back Way – Old Roads from Point A to Point B

There were two ways to get to Mom Mom and Pop Pop’s house in Havre de Grace. You could either take the interstates skirting Baltimore, which, until the late 1980s, had not all been built and required cutting through Reisterstown’s … Continue reading