It’s An “R” Month: Maryland Oyster Pie

Though a chilled oyster sliding down your throat and followed with cold white wine seems perfectly apropos for the summer months, it was only recently that the old tradition “only eat oysters in a month with “R” in it” has … Continue reading

Sauerkraut: It’s Thanksgiving in Maryland

Don’t knock it: sauerkraut is great on the Thanksgiving table. And it’s a tradition that falls almost exclusively within Maryland’s borders. When I moved away for my first job in Boston, I was surprised that Thanksgiving sauerkraut horrified my colleagues … Continue reading

Settling the Affairs of the Nation

Happy Friday. There are a lot of fun things to explore in this print sold by Bowles & Carver in London. I’m enjoying the tavern maid’s cap, the spitjack (which rotated roating meats over the fire, the standing man’s pack … Continue reading

Time to Put By Peas, Beans, Fruits Etc.

I find it interesting that Hannah Glasse specifies here that you may not use earthenware or stone crocks that have previously been used in your springhouse (“laid in water”). An edict to do the work on a fine clear day … Continue reading

Strawberries

Why bother with those wantonly oversized pale fruits that come in the plastic boxes all winter long from California, that give barely any aroma when sniffed? They are equivalents of the rock hard, styrafoam-textured Florida tomato – a freak of … Continue reading

18th Century Stewed Cheese Recipe? Why, Yes! Cookbook Blog from the Westminster City Archives

Does the title sound too Anthony Bourdain? The Westminster City Archives has established a blog for a cookbook in its collection of compiled recipes. The handwritten volume compiles recipes with roots in the late 17th century up until the first … Continue reading

A Maryland Breakfast: Fried Red Tomatoes in Cream Gravy

I recently visited my great uncle, Uncle B, in Arizona. Having left our ancestral seat for a life of western adventure in 1947, we don’t have all that much in common. However, as conversations meander in and out of the … Continue reading

Feeding America: Michigan State University’s Cookbook Digitization Project

How did we eat in the past? Michigan State University’s Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook project digitizes 76 historic cookbooks (out of the collection of 10,000) from the late 18th century to the early 20th century. The archives are … Continue reading

Caraway.

Caraway. It’s lyrical. It’s herbal, savory, and astringent.My French friends confuse it for a cumin seed. ┬áIt evokes strong feelings of admiration or disgust, depending on whose palate is assessing it. And it’s one of my favorite flavorings. When I … Continue reading

Cleveland’s West Side Market

My brother Mr. F is Cleveland’s Man about Town. During my May visit, he toured me around a number of sites and neighborhoods, including Shaker Square, downtown, Detroit Seaway, and Cleveland’s West Side Market. I knew zip about Cleveland, beyond … Continue reading