Doors Open Baltimore – This Saturday, October 25

After my last post about the decay of Baltimore progressive civic icons from the 19th century, Doors Open Baltimore celebrates the industrial past that made it possible this Saturday, October 25, 2014 from 10am-4pm. Fascinating physical industrial heritage spanning from … Continue reading

The Zoo, the Park, and a Baltimore Befuddlement

I’m not an expert on Baltimore, by any means. I’ve never lived there. I was born in Towson and grew up in Carroll County. But Baltimore was my first exposure to City and all that big “C” entails. The redeveloped … Continue reading

Small Stove, Big Heft: AGA Now Makes a 24″ Model

AGA now makes a 24″ stand alone range. They intend it as an extension piece for their larger ranges, but it functions as a complete cooktop and double oven unit by itself. My concern, besides the $6000 price tag (makes … Continue reading

Racer Dips

That’s 1930s speak for “roller coaster.” At least it was to my grandmother, Gurnice Stephens. She grew up on Mt. Pleasant Orchard in Harford County, but worked as a nanny and a nightclub violinist in Baltimore during the 1930s and … Continue reading

Don’t Confuse Geisha and Courtesans (Oiran and Tayu)

It is apparent from my forays around Pinterest and the web that images of geisha and courtesans are often mislabeled. For those unfamiliar with subtleties in the styling and wear of kimono, obi, and traditional Japanese hairstyles, it can be … Continue reading

Transportation Tuesday: Old Railway Storefront Design

During my maternity leave, I joined Abandoned Rails on Facebook. During those 1am and 3am feeds (lucky me) the almost 7,000 members on Abandoned Rails posted fascinating photos of endeavors past rusting into the dirt. They are stories of industry … Continue reading

Wanderlust Wednesday: Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Redux

Better known as the PATH, the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad began shuttling passengers through its cast iron tunnels between Manhattan and points in New Jersey in 1908. My travels have been constrained in the last couple of months due to … Continue reading

Transit Tuesday: NYC Department of Records Photo Archive and the Williamsburg Bridge Streetcar

The incredible site that is the NYC Department of Records Photo Archive showcases the grit and mechanics of the 20th century city. Some of the photographs are iconic, such as If you go, use the classification tree on the left. … Continue reading

Small Living Isn’t Morally Inferior

What happened to “less is more”? Dr. V and I are preparing for the arrival of our little guy Spud sometime in February (yes, ¬†you can expect a good deal of silence from me about that time). As I’ve described … Continue reading

Transportation Tuesday: Jim Crow Era Rail Car at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Recently, the National Museum of African American History installed two of its first objects, though walls are scant and the roof does not yet exist. A 77-ton rail car built in 1918 and used by the Southern Railway was installed … Continue reading